About Breast Pumping


Why have a massage mode and an expression mode?

The quick action Massage Mode will help stimulate your let-down, mimicking the natural experience of nursing. The Expression mode provides a steadier draw, like your baby, to empty your breasts quickly. The easy-to-use buttons on your pump make it easy to select a pumping mode and level that matches natural rhythm of your body.

When should I switch to expression mode?

Once you get your let-down on massage mode, switch to expression mode. The time it takes to achieve let-down will vary from mom to mom: for some it takes 30 seconds, others 5 minutes. Relax, breathe, and think of your little one—it will happen before you know it.

What are the advantages to a digital screen?

You can see the pump time, cycle, level of strength and adjust more accurately.

About Breast Milk


How much milk should I produce?

In the past it was thought that mothers needed to make more and more milk as their babies grew. Scientists now know that a healthy milk supply remains fairly constant over the six (6) months of exclusive breastfeeding. Your baby will take the amount he needs. During the early weeks, babies eat very frequently and grow very quickly. By day 10-14, babies should regain any weight they lost after birth. For the next few months babies will gain about an ½ ounce to 1 ounce a day. Around three (3) to four (4) months, a breastfed baby’s rate of grown begins to slow down. Your milk supply will continue to satisfy the baby until it is time to introduce solids at 6 months. Be the end of the first week of life, women who are breastfeeding one baby normally make between 19 to 30 ounces of milk each day. Infants between one (1) and six (6) months of age normally drink an average of 19 to 30 ounces a day. An average size “meal” for a baby is between three (3) to five (5) ounces of breas-tmilk. Formula is harder to digest and less well absorbed. Formula fed babies may need larger feeds. Consult your healthcare professional for advice.

How long can breast milk be kept in a cooler carrier?

You can safely store your breast milk for up to 10 hours in cooler bags. Direct exposure to the sun, like leaving the cooler in a car, severely reduces the cooling effectiveness. Breast milk is safely stored in a cooler at/or below 59 degrees for up to 24 hours. Consult a lactation consultant or healthcare provider for further information.

Can I transport my breast milk on an airplane?

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) allows mothers flying with, and without, their child to bring breast milk in quantities greater than 3 ounces as long as it is declared for inspection at the security checkpoint. Please check the TSA website for the most up-to-date information regarding restrictions.

How do I defrost my breast milk?

Thaw milk overnight in the refrigerator, or hold the bottle under warm running water until thawed. You can also place the sealed container in a bowl of warm water for 20 minutes to bring it to body temperature. Do not let the water reach the level of the container cap. Thawed milk is safe in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. CAUTION: Never microwave breast milk. Microwaving can cause severe burns to the baby’s mouth from hot spots that develop in the milk during microwaving. Microwaving can also change the composition of breast milk.

Why does my milk smell soured or soapy?

Rarely, some mothers notice their defrosted breastmilk has a soapy taste or odor. This is due to lipase, an enzyme, which helps to digest the fat content of the breastmilk. If this occurs, scald the breastmilk (do not bring to a boil) on a stove until tiny bubbles appear along the sides of the pan; do this before freezing. The scalding process will neutralize the enzyme, preventing the soapy taste or smell.

How do I store my breast milk?

It is normal for pumped milk to vary in color and consistency depending on your diet. Stored milk will separate into layers and the cream will rise to the top. Gently swirl (don’t shake) the bottle to mix the milk layers. Avoid adding freshly pumped milk to already cooled milk. You can add small amounts of cooled breast milk to the same refrigerated container throughout the day. Pumped milk may be added to frozen milk provided it is first chilled and the quantity is less than what is frozen. Freeze milk in two (2) to four (4) ounce portions. Small amounts thaw more quickly. You will waste less milk this way. Be sure to leave some extra room at the top of the container so the bottle or bag will not overflow when freezing or thawing. Seal containers tightly. Write the date on a piece of tape and place on the bag or bottle. Use the oldest milk first. If you do not plan to use the milk within a few days, freeze it right away in the coldest section of your freezer.

What can I do to increase my milk supply?

Factors affecting milk amount: 


• Length of time since last feeding/pumping session: If exclusively breastfeeding, pumping within ½-1 hour after feeding will yield about half of full feeding. 

• Time of the day: You will produce more the morning, as your prolactin levels are the highest in the morning. 

• Flange size: You will want to make sure you are in the proper flange size. 

• Practice with your pump: Sometimes it takes 1-2 weeks to adjust to your new pump, even if you’re only switching brands. 

• Your mood: When you are relaxed, you will be able to pump more milk. 

• Breast massage: Massaging the breast stimulates let-down. 

• Dual-phase pumping: Dual pumping stimulates more milk. Lean forward to allow more milk to flow into the bottles. If single pumping, switch breasts every 5-7 mins.

Troubleshooting


I plug my pump in but it’s not turning on.

Please try the following steps: unplug the power cord from the pump. Now your power cord separates into two pieces. You will want to remove the detachable prongs from the end that plugs into the wall. You should now have the pump, power cord, and prong adapter separated into three pieces. Reattach the prong piece, sliding it on to the end of your power cord pushing it down as hard as you can. You want to push it all the way down until you hear a loud snap. Plug your power cord into your pump, pushing it into the port until you hear it click. Then, plug your pump into a working outlet—try another outlet in your house that you know is working. Hold the power button for 30 seconds and let go. Give it 15 seconds and see if your pump now turns on.

My pump won’t charge!

Please try the following steps: unplug the power cord from the pump. Now your power cord separates into two pieces. You will want to remove the detachable prongs from the end that plugs into the wall. You should now have the pump, power cord, and prong adapter separated into three pieces. Reattach the prong piece, sliding it on to the end of your power cord pushing it down as hard as you can. You want to push it all the way down until you hear a loud snap. Plug your power cord into your pump, pushing it into the port until you hear it click. Then, plug your pump into a working outlet—try a second outlet in your house that you know is working. You should now see a battery symbol on your pump. Hold the power button for 30 seconds and let go. Give it 15 seconds and see if your pump now turns on. If it is charging the battery symbol should go away on the screen when plugged in.

Can I transport my breast milk on an airplane?

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) allows mothers flying with, and without, their child to bring breast milk in quantities greater than 3 ounces as long as it is declared for inspection at the security checkpoint. Please check the TSA website for the most up-to-date information regarding restrictions.

I have no or low suction.

Please try these steps: Make sure your white duckbill valves are attached and pushed fully up at the bottom of your flange where the bottle screws on. Also, check your duckbill valve for tears. Make sure the opening at the end is closed when not in use. If you need to replace your valves (we recommend every 3-4 months) you can find them on our store page. If you use the blue valve with the membrane in place of the duckbill valve, ask yourself: Is the membrane in good shape? Is the membrane covering the blue surface and flat? If you are single pumping, make sure your air cap is pushed fully on. Are your breast flanges/shields the right size? If you are not sure, consult a licensed lactation counselor. Check your tubing to see if there are any holes in the tubing. Attach the tubing to the base of your pump and feel the suction. Is it too strong? If you are getting a strong suction we know that the pump motor is working well. It will be one of your accessories that will be the culprit. If you add your backflow protector, is the membrane moving? Are the movements soft or strong? If all is working well there, then attach the flange. Check to see if you are having the same issue on both sides. Do you single pump? Try swapping out your parts from one port to the other—does this change which side was not working if only one was the issue? Have you tried increasing the suction and cycle level? Lastly, what is your wash routine like? Are you only hand washing all your parts and never washing or doing anything to the tubing? Are you using only our parts? If you have further questions, please visit our contact page, we’d love to help.

I am experiencing pain when I pump.

Are your breast flanges/shields the right size? Try turning the suction level down. You shouldn’t experience pain while pumping. If you aren’t sure if the flange/shield size is right, consult a licensed lactation consultant or go to our contact page, we’re here to help.

How do I sanitize?

Sanitizing parts for the first time—You will want to boil the plastic pieces of your collection kits for 3-5 minutes, this will include the bottles, bottle caps and lids, the flanges, and the plastic casings of the backflow protector. Bring water to a boil and then remove from the stove before putting your parts in for 3-5 minutes. Hand wash the duckbill valves and white membrane of the backflow protector with warm, soapy water. You will not need to sterilize the small tubing as it’s a closed-system pump. Allow your parts to completely air-dry before assembling, or dry with a clean cloth. Washing the parts after each use—After each use you will want to wash all parts with warm, soapy water, except for the small tubing. Air-dry all parts completely before reassembling, or dry with a clean cloth. You may refrigerate your parts in between uses if you don’t have access during the day to a water source, and follow the washing instructions later that day when you have access to water. Make sure all parts are washed and dried thoroughly following the instructions above, for best performance. It is not recommended to use a sterilizer, microwave, steam bag, or dishwasher dry cycle as part of the cleaning process.